Should we schedule a dinner?

Right, so, it’s been almost a year since we hosted a dinner. Time flies!

Jeanne and Dan's weddingIt’s been a crazy year. I got a new job. Six months later, that company got acquired and I had to get ANOTHER new job. We got engaged, and then we got married. And both of us now have pretty intense jobs at pretty intense tech companies.

So we haven’t had a whole lot of free time.

But we both miss Hearsay. It was fun to plan the menus together and test all the wine pairings (ahem, very important research!). Every group that joined us for a meal was unique and interesting, and it was pretty fantastic to watch friendships form between people who probably never would have met otherwise.

J+D at Far West FungiThe question is, do you miss Hearsay too?

Leave a comment if you’d like us to get another dinner on the books. (Hint: we’re almost always willing to schedule something special if you come to us with a full group of 12.)

We’ve toyed with a few new ideas—three courses instead of six, cocktail parties with hors d’oeuvres instead of a sit-down dinner, brunch… if you have strong feelings about any of them, let us know.

Cheers!
Jeanne + Dan

Busy Saturday? Seats available for our sherry dinner

Saturday’s dinner is shaping up to be pretty epic—and if you’re the spontaneous type, you’re in luck! We’ve had some cancellations and we still have a few seats available. Email us now to make your reservation.

We’ll be pairing some of the world’s best sherries with each of our six tapas-inspired courses:

    • Boquerones, citrus, black olive
    • Sea bass crudo, Oro Blanco, radish, honey, paprika oil
    • Crispy sweetbreads, potato, braised pea shoots
    • Octopus, spring onion, blood orange, aioli
    • Short rib, savory caramel, slaw, black sesame
    • Cardamom duck egg ice cream sandwich

We learned an enormous amount at SherryFest West in Portland a few weeks ago, and we can’t wait take you on a guided tour of all the major sherry styles: fino, amontillado, palo cortado, oloroso, cream, and Pedro Ximenez. We’re planning to serve several wines that aren’t yet available in California, so this is a unique chance to try something rare and unusual—not to mention very, very delicious.

This dinner is $85, inclusive of wine pairings. Email us now to RSVP!

Reporting back from Sherryfest West 2013

Good things come in barrels. (Obviously.) Therefore, something that comes from many, many barrels must be extra good, right? We went to Portland last week to investigate this theory at Sherryfest West 2013.


Sherry, which is a fortified wine made from palomino grapes in the Jerez region of Spain, sees an awful lot of barrel time when it’s aged in a solera system. A solera is a series of barrels where part of the wine in each barrel is regularly moved to the next stage (or criadera) and replenished with new, younger wine from the criadera before it. This constant partial movement means that by the time wine is drawn out of the last criadera for bottling, it is a mix of wine that is relatively young and wine that can be very, very old—more than 150 years in some of the oldest soleras. During this process, the wine can be aged biologically (under a layer of flavor-producing yeast called flor) and/or oxidatively, by simply leaving the barrels about one-sixth empty to expose the wine to oxygen.

A lot of Americans share an unfortunate cultural memory of sherry as a treacly, cloying after-dinner drink—and a few decades ago, most of what you could buy on the American market probably wasn’t very good. But actually, the vast majority of sherry is completely dry. These dry sherries pair smashingly well with food, providing a range of nutty, saline, and umami tones and occasionally surprising notes like butter toffee, black olive, orange peel, or baking spices. Continue reading